Acquiring Grant Money

24th February 2018 – Arts Council of Wales

The first place that I want to research is the Arts Council. Arts Council of Wales offer grants to both individuals and organisations.

We want to identify and nurture individuals with creative talent and we want to enable creative professionals to develop their careers and be able to earn a sustainable living in Wales from their work.

http://www.arts.wales/funding

As an individual you can apply to the Arts Grants for Creative Professionals Scheme. For me the Professional Development Strand is the way to go. However, if I did attend College of Camberwell I would probably have to wait till I finish my studies before I can apply to this. The MA at College of Camberwell is classed as Extended Full Time – so it’s on a part time basis but called full time – I have to investigate what Arts Council of Wales consider this to be.

I spent quite a bit of time getting to know the rules when applying to the arts council. Eligibility Criteria appears to be as follows:

  • Must have a permanent address in Wales.
  • Over 18.
  • Not in Full time education – You are not eligible to apply if you are currently in full time education.
  • Provide evidence of artistic practice.
  • Have an understanding of equal opportunities and apply them in your work.
  • Have a Bank Account in your own name.
  • Not be in default on any financial agreement with Arts Council Wales. If you are in default You are eligible – but (You will need to satisfy any outstanding conditions before being eligible to apply. This could include returning project documentation or repaying funds.)

http://www.arts.wales/funding/eligibility-creative-professionals

In relation to Arts Grants in England, Rachel Dobbs writes:

In March 2018, Arts Council England revised their previous Grants For The Arts scheme, renaming it Arts Council National Lottery Project Grants. After the massive success of (and feedback from) the original #ACECheatsheet in 2016, here’s a revised ACE Project Grants application cheatsheet for the new Project Grants scheme (2018 onwards).

BLOG_-Cover-images

http://rachel.we-are-low-profile.com/blog/ace-g4a-application-cheatsheet/

Wales Arts International

Wales Arts International administers funding through the International Opportunities Fund.

IOF supports Wales based professional arts practitioners and organisations to undertake international visits aimed at the development of international work and the presentation and delivery of artistic work outside the UK. The fund operates on a rolling programme.

PRS Foundation’s International Showcase Fund

If you are an artist, band, songwriter or producer and have been invited to play an international showcasing festival or conference, you may be eligible for funding through PRS Foundation’s International Showcase Fund in partnership with Wales Arts International. Find out more about the partnership here. If you are eligible for this funding route, you may not apply to the International Opportunities Fund. Please contact us if you are unsure which funding route is best for you.

IOF Timeline

Scroll the Funding Timeline below to view a step by step summary of the process, read the guidelines and contact us before starting an online application for the International Opportunities Fund.

http://www.wai.org.uk/funding

Grant Writing for Dummies

GRANT WRITING FOR DUMMIES CHEAT SHEET

11 PLACES TO LOOK FOR GRANT FUNDING

  • Sit down with your work associates and ask these questions: Who are our corporate vendors? What bank or credit union processes our payroll? What local funders have given us money or in-kind contributions in the past five years? Do we still have a good relationship with these funders? Can we approach them again for funding support? After you have some answers, start taking action.

  • Call and make an appointment to visit every bank in your town, city, village, and county. There’s hidden money everywhere — even at your local banks. Find out who heads up the trust department (typically a trust officer) at each institution. Trust officers manage trust accounts for living and dead money-giving individuals and families. These trusts are often not highly advertised sources of grant money. Ask and get some guidelines for finding them and applying to them for grants.

  • Stroll over to the nearest large public or university library to access the Foundation Center’s Foundation Directory Online. This is your public-access, free-of-charge source for researching foundation and corporate funding sources.

  • Network with other grant writers to find out about their funding resource subscriptions. Ask what works and check out these additional possibilities.

  • Head down to your city and county economic development agencies to find out about any public monies available (contracts or grants) for your project.

  • If you have a community foundation in your county, call to get an appointment to meet with someone there to ask about the possibility of applying for capacity building funds for your organization.With a capacity building grant, you can contract with qualified consultants for grant writing, fundraising, board training, and volunteer coordination services.

  • Don’t forget to call your governor’s office and ask about state agency grant funding and other monies that may be available for your organization or business.

  • Attend all public events where the “who’s who” crowd will be gathered and hand out business cards. Just make sure your agency’s mission and contact info are on the card!

  • Prepare and distribute a press release to all local and regional media announcing that you have a project in need of funding.

  • Most importantly, call your congressional team members to let them know more about your organization and its need for grant funding. Ask if they can start to track any federal bucks that fit your needs.

9 TIPS FOR WRITING EFFECTIVE GRANT PROPOSALS

  • Use a storytelling approach (with supporting statistics) in such a compelling way that the reader can’t put down your application until she makes a positive funding decision. Make them cry!

  • Incorporate a case study of a real client your organization has served. Of course, change the name for confidentiality reasons. Show a real need of a real person.

  • Take advantage of online dictionaries and thesauruses to expand your command of new words and capture the grant decision maker’s attention.

  • Write to government funding agencies and request (under the Freedom of Information Act) copies of funded grant applications. Use these documents as examples of how to write an award-winning grant application.

  • Research proven best practices for your proposed solutions and incorporate language from the experts.

  • When you find best practices, look for the evaluation results of previously implemented programs similar to yours. Know what works and what doesn’t work before you write your proposed solution.

  • Eliminate multiple drafts from your writing habits because the most creative and “wow” words are often the first words you type.

  • Hire a proofreader or editor (or a college student) to read your writing and clean it up. Don’t have any money? Ask a trustworthy and capable co-worker or friend.

  • Write in short, hard-hitting sentences. Long-winded sentences almost always lose the reader.

3 GREAT WEBSITES FOR GRANT WRITING AND GRANT FUNDING

  • eCivis Grants Network: This is a subscription-based service with profiles for public and private sector funders.

  • The Foundation Center: This subscription-based service for private-sector funders offers several newsletters, including Philanthropy News Digest.

  • Grants.gov: Here, you can find government agency funding announcements for free.

http://www.dummies.com/business/nonprofits/grants/grant-writing-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/

 

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