London Gallery Visits 2

Leake Street Arches

Street art at its best – a continually changing space where street artists present their work.

Hayward Gallery

Diane Arbus: A comprehensive collection of photographs from the early career of Diane Arbus, fifty of the 100 photographs have never been shown in Europe. Most of her images depict urban life in the 50’s and 60’s and she creates very striking photographs where the subject may be in the midst of city life – yet can appear almost solitary. No Photographs allowed unfortunately.

Kader Attia: An exhibition depicting over twenty years of the past twenty years and following several thematic strands.

Barbican Centre

Daria Martin – Tonight the World

I visited The Curve at the Barbican Centre to see the Daria Martin Exhibition Tonight the World where she has an atmospheric film re-enacting some of her grandmothers diary entries from a 35 year collection. She also uses Gaming Technology to explore the historical context where her grandmother had fled her homeland to avoid Nazi occupation.

 

London Gallery Visits

On arrival in London the day before the MA Fine Art Digital Low Residency, I spent some time at the V& A and the Saatchi Gallery before finding my accomodation.

V&A: Trajan’s Column

As I had some time to kill I decided to visit Trajan’s Column, this is an exhibit that always impresses me by the sheer scale of the work. Comprised of reliefs made from plaster and built up in sections they cover the outside of a brickwork column. The reliefs are each numbered so that they could be reassembled easily at the V&A. I have only seen the columns from above previously and it was a good opportunity for me to be on the ground looking up at the columns.

Saatchi: Black Mirror Art as Social Satire

Below are some of the pieces that we saw while at the Saatchi.

Full Circle by Georgii Uvs

Marriage by John Stezaker displays publicity shots of classic film stars spliced and overlapped with famous faces.

Endless Endless by Des Hughes – A polyester resin, iron powder, fibreglass, plastic and wood sculpture that resembles a prone figure.

Couch and From 2nd to Third by Roman Stanczak

After Louise by Wendy Meyer

img_6578

London Fine Art Trip

I decided to make the most of the opportunity for a visit to London and stay for two days. After researching current exhibitions, I wanted to visit the Space Shifters exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, the Tate Modern and join the group from college at the Victoria Miro to see the Yayoi Kusama exhibition. These two days became a moment in time where I was able to see artwork that alters the perception – definitely a mind altering two days.

Hayward Gallery

My first stop was the Space Shifters exhibition at Hayward Gallery. Warned as I entered, that the exhibition is design to make you feel disorientated, the Space Shifters exhibits certainly met that objective. An awe-inspiring collection of work from 20 international artists with eye-catching sculptures and installations throughout.

Alicja Kwade’s piece WeltenLinie (2017) is a steel structure that uses double-sided mirrors and cleverly situated objects. I found myself tentatively navigating the structure, not always sure that I was looking through the object or at a mirror. The structure seemed to become almost a landscape in its own right with my perception of the space being somewhat greater than my perception of the objects.

img_1589A turntable originally used by the American military and repurposed into the Untitled Parabolic Lens by Fred Eversley. The process used by Eversley to create these parabolic sculptures intrigued me. Using a potter’s wheel to create moulds partially filled with liquid polyester that forms a symmetical curve once cool and hardened. Being able to look through this piece as well as at this piece gave the potential for different perspectives that would be continually changing depending on the light and the people around the piece. I really did feel this was a glass piece when I first saw it – reminded me very much of a prism that I had as a child.

The main reason I wanted to attend the Space Shifters was to see Narcissus Garden by Yayoi Kusama. A collection of stainless steel orbs as an installation. First displayed in the Venice Biennale in 1966 as a large-scale intervention, with the plastic mirrored spheres sold for two dollars a piece. A surreal landscape of glistening reflective orbs I found myself drawn into the reflective nature of the piece, attempting to identify markers in the room within the reflective surfaces.

Fascinated by architectural structures and gallery spaces, I always enjoy visiting the Hayward for the purely enjoying the space that this gallery embodies. The Square Tube Series by Charlott Posenenske blended effortlessly with the architecture of the building, so much so that it would have been easy to overlook the piece as part of the building. Prefabricated galvanised steel units that at first impression seem to have always been there, as part of the fabric of the building – yet on closer inspection they follow routes that lead to dead ends – open into nothingness and simply do not make sense – subverting the space that they inhabit.

Having seen the piece 20:50 (1987) by Richard Wilson when it was previously exhibited at the Saatchi Gallery, I was not even sure I would queue to see this piece. However, in the end, I did queue and it was very worth it. The two viewings gave me completely different experiences. At the Saatchi Gallery, I had viewed this piece from a balcony above that gave me the essence of the reflection in the engine oil, but little else.

At the Hayward, however I unwittingly walked along the inclining narrow passageway into the centre of the room I immediately experienced a sense of vertigo. This was strange for me, as it is not something that usually bothers me. I really had to struggle in my mind to remind myself that I was standing on the floor and not on the edge of a parapet far above the reflections of the ceiling around me, even if that is how it felt.

The Sky Mirror, Blue (2016) by Anish Kapoor dominates the outside sculpture terrace. I had plenty of time to watch this piece as I queued for 20:50. This concave mirror turns the space around it upside down and appears almost like a portal into a different dimension as we can look through the piece at the reflected skyline above.

Tate Gallery

In particular, I wanted to re-visit the Artist Room for Joseph Beuys, however found a few interesting things to see whilst I was there.

The end of the Twentieth Century (1983–5) by Joseph Beuys an installation of basalt rocks roughly measuring between one and two and half metres in length with a cone shaped hole drilled into one end. The holes smoothed and voered in felt before the previously removed polished basalt placed back into each of the holes. Prior to Beuys death in 1986, the work had not be installed.

This work suggests a relationship between the natural ancient world and the new world that we live in today. His ecological concerns during this final stage of his life may have been of influence in this piece.

img_1949I happened upon The Clock (2010) installation by Christian Marclay quite by accident. Prior to viewing the piece I had no real understanding other than it was a film called The Clock. I soon realised that this montage of film was running in local time and I then realised that the film was a 24-hour piece. The film covers many thousands of film clips collected from decades of cinematic history. I became quite intrigued. Not only by the fact that the film serves as an accurate way to measure time, but by the painstaking research that must have taken place prior to the film being produced. I sat for 45 minutes watching this film and could have quite easily sat for many hours – quite an achievement for someone who gets bored easily.

The Between Object and Architecture

The Between Object and Architecture exhibit at the Tate modern shows a collection of sculptural pieces in a way that is more engaging for the viewer. Given my interest in architecture, the geometric shapes and configurations were interesting for me to see.

The artists in this exhibition used materials found in the everyday buildings around us; some materials used were from construction and others from building sites and the street. The aim was to provide a more direct encounter with the sculptural objects for the viewer.

The Passing Winter (2005) by Yayoi Kusama was the piece that I wanted to see prior to visiting the Between Object and Architecture exhibit. I was intrigued to know how the process of making for this piece.

A glass cube placed on top of an x-shaped pedestal, which is lined on the inside and outside with mirrors. Each side has three circles cut into the glass revealing an infinite world of circles in the middle of the cube. The circles seem to float with the surface altering depending on the position of viewing and the light in the room.

I really enjoyed being able to interact with the Pavilion Suspended in a Room I (2005) by Chrisina Iglesias. You are encouraged to navigate through the latticed panels providing a sense of being enclosed and detached from the rest of the room. Initially the panels appear to be matting suspended from the ceiling, yet on closer inspection words begin to appear in the panels. These words are taking from the science fiction novel

Rendezvous with Rama (1973) by Arthur C Clarke. This piece relates to a series by the artist known as Celosia (Spanish for jealousy or slated shutter/blind).

Drawn to the piece, Stack (1975) by Tony Cragg, and fascinated by the every-day materials used to create a solid cube by packing them together, wood, magazines and building materials making the cube personify the layering found in geological structures.

A suggestion towards our relationship with the natural world and the impact of man on nature, using the man made to represent something you would see in the natural world.

Victoria Miro Gallery

I was very fortunate to visit “The Moving Moment when I went to the universe” exhibition by Yayoi Kusama at the Victoria Miro gallery. A collection of works from the My Eternal Soul series, a series of bronze sculptures (pumpkins and flowers) and the large mirrored infinity room.

On arrival we were ushered three at a time into the “Infinity mirrored room – my heart is dancing into the universe, 2018” to spend 60 seconds in the otherworldly installation. The inifinity room with mirrored walls filled with paper lanterns with changing coloured lighting inside. Not enough time to fully appreciate this room and feel the effects that it might have on you, however even just that short space of time was enough to make you feel you had stepped into another realm.

The Bronze Pumpkins exhibited reference the cultivation of seeds by her family and her fascination with the natural world. A plant that appears repeatedly throughout her work, appearing in prints, sculptures, installations, paintings and environmental pieces.

In the garden were the painted bronze Flowers that speak all about my heart given to the sky (2018).

img_2238Upstairs in the gallery were paintings from My Eternal Soul series. These large-scale canvases now form part of a collection of hundreds of works. They are surreal and colourful with a strong representation of repeating patterns reminding me almost of ancient populations and shamanic symbology with geological structures and patterns.

Having not painted for some time, these paintings have inspired me to pick up a paintbrush again and continue to paint from my imagination, akin to the paintings of my earlier years.

Parasol Unit

I was especially interested in the exhibition by Heidi Bucher combining some of her latex works created during the last two decades of her life including films that document her whilst working with the latex pieces. Known for her casting of room interiors, objects, clothing and the body using latex skinnings. The skinnings create a lasting physical impression of something that held a memory for her. What I found interesting was the process of lining the objects with a gauze or mesh before adding the liquid latex and removing when almost dry. The addition of the gauze creates a stronger final material for display.

Liverpool Biennale 2018

This page documents our visit to the Liverpool Biennal on the 18th and 19th October 2018.


Walker Art Gallery

Our first stop of the trip was the Walker Art Gallery for the John Moores Painting Prize the UK’s longest running painting competition having started in 1957 and run for 60 years.

King and QueenThe winner Jacqui Hallum with her piece King and Queen of Wands, an ink painting on cotton fabric. The piece is inspired by a plethora of imagery taken from tarot cards, illustrations in Art Nouveau childrens books, medival woodcuts and leaded glass windows.

I was initially enthralled by the lightness and the fluidity of the piece and intrigued by the essence of childlike storytelling that left me wanting to know more. Always impressed by work on fabric it was refreshing to see that this competition is embracing painting in the broadest sense.

One HundredI was also very taken with the piece called One Hundred Harvests by Liz Elton. Again I was initially struck by the etherealness of the fabric and the tactile nature of the piece as it floated airily with the movement of air in the room. Made from water miscible oil on recycling bags stitched together with silk thread, it references our relationship with recycling and the way we discard our food resources so easily.

St Georges Hall

The piece Reenactment of Heaven by Inci Eviner is a piece that was commisioned for the Liverpool Biennale and considers the position of women in heaven, dismissing  perceptions in societies where women bow to that greater masculine authority. A unique film that distorts one’s perception, based on a series of drawings and recording using a green screen the lower part uses many props and masks that make you question reality. Interesting use of two projectors and the impeccable cross over between the projections in the centre.

Reenactment of Heaven

KeicheyuheaThe work Keicheyuhea (2017) by the artist Aslan Gaisumov (who also has the piece People of No Consequence (2016) on display at the Victoria Gallery and Museum. This piece shows the artists grandmother returning to her homeland 73 years after the Soviet deportation of her people to Central Asia with her community the Chechen and the Ingush people. A very moving piece where the impact of what had happened in this lady’s early life very apparent. Watching her as she comes to terms with the enormity of her return as memories of her life here come flooding back.

The screening in the courtroom at St Georges Hall is a film called Two Meetings and a Funeral by Naeem Mohaiemen reflects on the political coalition of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) and the Organisation of Islamic Co-operation (OIC) and shows where conventient alliances were made during the struggle for UN Recognition by the Bangladshi and the Palestinian decolonisation and the Portuguese in South Africa.

Open Eye Gallery

The work Nigerian Monarchs by George Osodi depict regional rulers from Nigeria in their ceremonial regalia that now represent a long lost power. Referencing the colonial past of Europe and that some of these ruler’s ancestors were kings at the time of slavery. An attempt to redress inaccurate represntation by photographing these rulers in their stately and dignified manner. Personnally, I would have like to have seen photographs of their wider community with these images.

nigeria.png

Tate Liverpool

The Intermediates (2015-ongoing) by Haegue Yang is an overwhelmingly immersive environment that refers to both traditional arts and craft and modern production methods and questions the definition of paganism. Recordings of wildlife from the British Library, Suggestions of folk tradition, such as the maypole and a wallpaper that brings modern hsitory and pagan tradition together is most definitely an onslaught to the senses that brings about much afterthought in an attempt to make sense of the many representations.

I was keen to see the work Your face is / not enough (2016) by Kevin Beasley which gathers NATO issued gas masks, microphone stands and megaphones into an installation of unique tribal-esque masks made from pigmented foam and other materials. These items that reflect control of an overriding authority alongside individual or collective acts of protest, power and protection.

The Cheyenne-style headresses whose feathers are carved from the soles of Nike trainrs are a fascinating collection of sculptures. Made by the artist Brian Jungen, the pieces Warrier 1, 3 and 4 allude to pride and determination in the indigenous communities, and reflect the effects of colonisation and remnants of conflict.

I was especially moved by the piece, The marks left behind (2014) by Duane Linklater. In fact initially I felt so repulsed that I didn’t even want to go into the room with this installation. However, I put on my brave boots and in I went and although I didn’t stay long it was long enough to gain some insight into the fur trade in Canada. The skunk pelts very much suggest the life of the animal and their spirit that some believe remains even in death, a consideration on cultural loss, social anmesia and family identity in the context of current and historical lives of the indigenous people. A psychologically very powerful piece which had a huge impact on me. I didn’t photograph this piece.

Crosby Beach

Another Place by Antony Gormley is an installation of 100 cast iron sculptures – cast in his own image extending over a 3km stretch of beach, all looking out to sea towards the North Wales coast, in a seemingly silent moment of contemplation. This was the end of our first day and the perfect time to view the sculptures, just as the sun was setting.

Blue Coat

lionVariations on a Ghost by Abbas Akhavan references the destruction of ancient sculptures depicting the Assyrain deity Lamassu (half man-half lion). This piece is constructed using a technique call dirt ramming where soil and water are compacted together to produce a sculptural element. This piece will deteriorate and change over time developing a hard grey stone-like crust suggesting the deterioration of the destroyed sculptures over time.

Fact

I particularly wanted to see the work by filmmaker Agnes Varda at Fact. A three changel video installation that portrays a poetic outlook on the temporality and the flow of human life. The three films are Documenteur (1981), Vagabond (1985) and The Gleaners (2000) and I was most drawn to the film Vagabond which instigated a strong emotional reaction in me. The films question the effect images have on our personal and collective memory. One’s own experiences in life will definitely have an impact on our perception of this video installation.

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral

The visit to Liverpool Anglican Cathedral was quick but interesting in particular with the Message of Love by Tracy Emin and a quick visit to the Whispering Arch. Definitely a must for another visit when I have more time.

Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral

Part of the large project, Time Moves Quickly, the commision by Ryan Gander of five bench link sculptures behind the Liverpool Metropolital Catherdral reconfigured a model of the modernist cathedral by Frederick Gibberd into simplistic building blocks. These were then reassembed by schoolchildren of Liverpool and reproduced large scale to create these five benches.

Victoria Gallery and Museum

Whilst at Victoria Gallery and Museum we visited two specific pieces:

  • People of No Consequence (2016) by Aslan Gaisumov
  • Tightrope (2015) by Taus Makhacheva

People of No Consequence is by the artist Aslan Gaisumov who also has the piece Keicheyuhea (2017) on display at St Georges Hall. This is a recording of the first meeting of a group of Chechen and Ingush survivors from the Soviet Deporation of 1944 to Central Asia. The film proceeds to document the survivors as they take their seats in preparation for this meeting.

People.png

The piece Tightrope shows the fifth generation tightrope walker Rasul Abakarov, transports 61 artworks across a tightrope from one hilltop to another in the mountainous region of Dagestan. He attempts almost impossible feats in his quest to move the artworks and one is not entirely sure that what you are seeing is actually real.

tight.png

Great George Street

Banu Cennetoglu has installed The List at Great George Street, originally compiled by United for Intercultural Action and distributed by The Guardian on World Refugee Day on 20th June 2018.  Tracing information that relates to the deaths of more than 34,000 refugees and migrants in Europe since 1993.

This piece of work has fascinated me, not only because of the sheer scale of the list, but because of the meticulous archiving and the story associated with the list and the subsequent removal and damage at the Great George Street in Liverpool.

the list

Castle Park Art Gallery

Friday 18th May 2018

Today I visited the Castle Park Art Gallery for the opening of my fellow students exhibition of work. A really lovely Art space and an excellent exhibition- well worth visiting.

I was particularly inspired by the red intertwining wire and papier-mâché pieces drawn from the Weaver and spent a long time sat with this piece. Although not directly related it made me reflect on my own heart and circulatory issues.

img_7256

img_7076

Meriem Alami // Diaspora

This space came into being as a visual documentation of existing in Diaspora and its daily challenges to construct a sense of the constant growing identity in the gap ”in-between” the original homeland and the new home, a transitional period that welcomes reconciliations of cultural differences which merge together in what is called ”The Third Space”, a space where there is a stronger cultural liaison with home of origin while growing an appreciation, respect and love for the new home and its culture, in that case beautiful North Wales.

http://www.castleparkarts.co.uk/?q=exhibitions/journal-diaspora-meriem-el-alami

Sarah Morley Force of Nature

Sarah works out of her studio in Vernon Mill, Stockport, where she also teaches painting and runs workshops.  Sarah’s work is inspired by nature, it’s  timeless beauty and drama. Sarah paints in an expressive semi abstract style. Colour, texture and energy are all equally important. In this exhibition Sarah presents a large number of her oil and mixed media seascapes, landscapes and abstract water paintings

http://www.castleparkarts.co.uk/?q=exhibitions/force-nature-sarah-morley-cheshire-artist

Celia Rowlands // Pamela Field // Pauline Lever // Drawn from the Weaver

A fascinating exhibition by Pamela Field, Pauline Leaver & Celia Rowlands. The exhibition is a visual exploration of the River Weaver from it’s source to entry into the Manchester Ship Canal…..

http://www.castleparkarts.co.uk/?q=exhibitions/drawn-weaver

Galeri – Second Year Exhibition Visit

Tuesday 14th May 2018

Today I visited Galeri to see the second year students exhibition. I felt that they had put on a good show, especially given there were a lot less of them than in our group.

 

Mostyn Gallery Visit

Saturday 12th May 2018

Today I paid a visit to Mostyn Gallery to see the current exhibitions. I was particularly interested in the Leviathan exhibition by Shezad Dawood.

Shezad Dawood

Leviathan is an episodic narrative around notions of borders, mental health and marine welfare issues of foremost concern, resonating profoundly with both coastal locations and contemporary life.

A ten-part film cycle that will unfold over the next three years, the work draws connections between human activity and marine ecology.
Three films have already been premiered in Venice, in conjunction with the 57th Art Biennale, with a fourth to be released in early September 2018.

In dialogue with a wide range of marine biologists, oceanographers, political scientists, neurologists and trauma specialists, Leviathan explores interconnections between these fields of work and will be presented through sculpture, textiles, museum specimens, films, conversations and online resource material.

As part of the first iteration of Leviathan after its Venice debut, Dawood will also show a newly commissioned painting drawing upon this specific context, and work with community groups based on the coastal location asking questions about how these issues might come to evolve in a future 20 to 50 years from now, and what that future might look like.

The exhibition is curated by Alfredo Cramerotti, MOSTYN Director, in dialogue with the artist.

https://www.mostyn.org/exhibition/shezad-dawood

Mike Perry – Land and Sea

I really enjoyed seeing the work produced by Mike Perry for Land and Sea and could see a strong connection with the current work of Simone Williams. Pretty sobering to reflect on the amount of discarded items that are washed up on our shores.

Mike Perry’s work engages with significant and pressing environmental issues, in particular the tension between human activity and interventions in the natural environment, and the fragility of the planet’s ecosystems.

This major new exhibition brings together recent bodies of work addressing how the natural biodiversity of landscapes and marine environments is undermined and made toxic by human neglect, agricultural mismanagement and the pursuit of short-term profit at the expense of long-term sustainability.

Combining conceptual aesthetics with a pressing concern for the marine environment, Perry’s images shed a different light on the health of the seascapes one might see in tourist brochures.

Môr Plastig (welsh for ‘Plastic Sea’) is an ongoing body of work that classifies objects washed up by the sea into groupings; bottles, shoes, grids, abstracts, and others. By using a high-resolution camera to capture the surface detail, the artist allows the viewer to ‘read’ markings and scars etched into the objects by the ocean over months and, in some cases, years. The viewer is intrigued and challenged by how a polluting object can be so aesthetically appealing.

In Perry’s words, “in addition to seeing these pieces as symbols of over-consumption and disregard for the environment, I also see them as evidence of the beauty and power of nature to sculpt our world”.

Land/Sea is originally produced by Ffotogallery, Cardiff, and curated by David Drake, Ffotogallery, and Ben Borthwick, Plymouth Arts Centre. The exhibition in MOSTYN has been developed in dialogue with Adam Carr, Visual Arts Programme Curator, and Alfredo Cramerotti, Director. The accompanying publication includes contributions from the writers George Monbiot and Skye Sherwin.

https://www.mostyn.org/exhibition/mike-perry

Estella Scholes

Having previously attended a book making workshop with Estella, I was particularly keen to see this exhibit of her work and was very inspired by what I saw.

Our series of solo exhibitions celebrating contemporary printmaking continues in Gallery 6 with Estella Scholes.

Many of Estella’s references are gathered from direct observation whilst wandering along the shorelines of North Wales, in particular the Llyn Peninsula, where evidence of an almost vanished industrial past can be found. Broken bits of old jetties, rusted metal and other manmade debris linger amongst the stones and more familiar beach treasures.

She is intrigued by the ambiguity of natural and manmade forms, eroded almost to abstraction by the elements. Transitory arrangements of colour, texture and shape endlessly appear and disappear in the liminal space between the tides.  These fleeting impressions linger in the mind, to be further abstracted and rearranged by memory.

All prints are for sale framed or unframed, and the Collectorplan scheme allows you to buy unique pieces of contemporary art and craft over a period of 12 months interest free.

https://www.mostyn.org/exhibition/estella-scholes

 

UAL Open Day/London Trip March 2018

Wednesday 21st March

Ultimately this trip to London was to visit the Open Day at Camberwell College. Due to the length of time it took me to travel and becoming ill overnight, I only managed to visit South London Gallery and Camberwell College. South London Gallery were in the middle of setting up for an exhibition. My visit to Camberwell College went really well.

My intention was to see if there was anything that made me feel uncomfortable about applying to this college and quite honestly, there was absolutely nothing that put me off. The facilities were first-rate and the tutors/existing students very welcoming. I did have a concern prior to the visit about the cohesiveness of an online group. The Tutor Jonathan Kearney reassured me that in fact the online students often have a greater bond as a group than students who attend full time.

The course structure was explained, in essence a weekly Skype group meeting on a Tuesday afternoon accompanied by tutorials and several intensive fortnights where attendance in person is beneficial. On to the application for me now.

London/Margate Fine Art Trip 2018

I created my own itinerary for this trip, shown below, this blog is written around the itinerary I had created. See MW_Itinerary

Monday 5th February 2018

Turner Contemporary Gallery (Travel: Rhyl/Euston/St Pancras/Margate)

The following photographs were taken to assist with my website and model preparation for the Dissertation Dissertation module.

Whilst at Turner Contemporary, I  also visited the following exhibitions.

Journeys with the Waste Land

Journeys with ‘The Waste Land’ is a major exhibition exploring the significance of T.S. Eliot’s poem The Waste Land through the visual arts.

In 1921, T.S. Eliot spent a few weeks in Margate at a crucial moment in his career. He arrived in a fragile state, physically and mentally, and worked on The Waste Land sitting in the Nayland Rock shelter on Margate Sands. The poem was published the following year, and proved to be a pivotal and influential modernist work, reflecting on the fractured world in the aftermath of the First World War as well as Eliot’s own personal crisis.

Presenting over 60 artists, and almost 100 objects, the exhibition includes works by Fiona Banner, Cecil Collins, Tacita Dean, Elisabeth Frink, Patrick Heron, Edward Hopper, Barbara Kruger, Helen Marten, Henry Moore, Paul Nash, Paula Rego, John Smith and JMW Turner. The exhibition explores how contemporary and historical art can enable us to reflect on the poem’s shifting flow of diverse voices, references, characters and places.

The exhibition is the culmination of a three year project designed to develop a pioneering approach to curating. Local residents, coming together as the Waste land Research Group, have developed the entire exhibition. Journeys with ‘The Waste Land’ is consequently the result of many months the group have spent discussing personal connections between art, poetry and life.

https://www.turnercontemporary.org/exhibitions/journeys-with-the-waste-land

Another Time

At first glimpse this installation really makes you think that it is someone in the sea. unfortunately both times I visited, the tide was in, so I couldn’t get close to the sculpture.

“The history of western sculpture has been concerned with movement. I wish to celebrate the still and silent nature of sculpture. The work is designed to be placed within the flow of lived time.” – Antony Gormley

JUST ANNOUNCED: Turner Contemporary is thrilled to confirm that the Antony Gormley sculpture ANOTHER TIME will be staying in Margate for another year. The cast iron statue that was installed on Fulsam Rock beside Turner Contemporary this summer has been granted an extension and will remain in situ until November 2018.

ANOTHER TIME is a series of one hundred, solid cast-iron figures by Antony Gormley who is known for his sculptures and installations that explore the experience of being human, of inhabiting a human body.

https://www.turnercontemporary.org/exhibitions/another-time-for-margate-folkestone

Dutch/Light (for Agenta Block)

Chatham Historic Dockyard Trust and Turner Contemporary have commissioned artist Jyll Bradley to make a new piece of work for summer 2017. Dutch/Light (for Agneta Block) marks the 350th anniversary of the Dutch Raid on the River Medway, which brought about the end of the Anglo-Dutch wars, peace between the two nations and an unlikely cultural exchange based on growing plants.Jyll Bradley, Dutch Light for Agneta Block, credit Stephen White, 1 (1)

At the time of the Dutch Raid, Dutch growers were pioneering early glasshouse technology, which started with the simple idea of leaning glass frames against a south-facing wall – the so-called ‘Dutch Light’ – which led to a horticultural revolution that crossed the North Sea.

“I call the work Dutch/Light (for Agneta Block) because the first person to ripen a pineapple in Europe was Agneta Block, a Dutch horticulturalist and art collector. Pineapple growing using the ‘Dutch Light’ and southerly wall system was the focus of early Anglo-Dutch horticultural exchange. I feel the story of the Dutch raid is very male; a fascinating by-product of it is a woman growing a pineapple – and our love of glasshouses today.” Jyll Bradley

In the work, five tall ‘Dutch Lights’ are turned on their side and leant against south-facing walls to create an open structure that is activated by the sun, and under which audiences can walk and sit while bathed in geometric colour.

https://www.turnercontemporary.org/exhibitions/dutch-light-for-agneta-block

Ink and Blood Exhibition

Saturday 14th October 2017 – International Museum of Slavery

I visited the International Museum of Slavery in Liverpool to see the Ink and Blood Exhibition being held there as part of the Black History Month. Below are the pieces that caught my attention the most.

Cotton Slave Adam and Cotton Slave Eve by Alice Kettle

“Alice Kettle is a contemporary textile/fibre artist based in the UK. She has established a unique area of practice by her use of a craft medium, consistently and on an unparalleled scale. The scale of her work belies their component parts: individual tiny stitches, which combine to form great swathes of colour, painterly backgrounds incorporating rich hues and metallic sheen.” Sara Roberts

She trained as a painter, and has work represented in many international collections.

http://alicekettle.co.uk/

Timalle by Francois Piquet

Mounpapyé series

Paper, Resin, Iron Blades, Mirror, 2011

“Timalle”: a writing game on the Creole “Timal” (little male), which means “boy”, and is a very affectionate way to call a man or a young man.

Timalle (lit. “small trunk”) is a reminder of the status of “movable property” defined for slaves by the “Black Code”.

Timalle is presented at the exhibition “LE FER & LA PEAU”, which also includes the projection of 3 videos, including “Timalle”.

“Timalle”: 5’20s movie. The story of “Timalle”, series Mounpapyé, figure of the West Indian society. Watch the movie – see the movie.

This film and the filmed sculpture are traces of an artistic process: the transformation of “Timal” to “Timalle”.

http://www.francoispiquet.com/mounpapye-timalle-piquet.htm

Timalle is part of the collection of the FAC, Contemporary Art Fund of the General Council of Guadeloupe.

Download the Slavery Crimes Victims Reparations Application form at http://www.reparations-art.org.
Reparation forms / Iron & skin
A film by François Piquet, 2017.
Images François Piquet & Nicolas Merault.
With the support of DAC Guadeloupe, Conseil Régional de la Guadeloupe, International Slavery Museum of Liverpool.
“Ink & Blood” exhibition at International Slavery Museum of Liverpool

https://vimeo.com/232900376

UK Diaspora (2007) by Kimathi Donkor

I was really interested to see how this map had been created from cultural remembrances and this has inspired me to look more conceptually at the topic of being separate from one’s homeland, and the issues that can be visually represented through the use of a “map”.

Donkor was born in BournemouthEngland, in 1965.[3] He has said of his background: “I was born in the UK to an Anglo-Jewish mother and Ghanaian father, but was raised by my adopted parents who were from Jamaica and the UK. We lived for a time in Zambia, Central Africa, where my adopted dad worked as a vet. I finished my schooling in the west of England, then moved to London, where I eventually settled. In the meantime, my adopted parents had divorced and remarried, so the family diversity actually increased, as Zambians also joined the party. This smörgåsbord life induced an early sense of the wondrous, and sometimes maddening, complexity of identities and histories, which, I think, has been reflected in my artworks. Precisely because I was such an intimate witness to the multiple crossings and re-crossings of stories, images and journeys from around the world.”[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kimathi_Donkor

Breaking the Shackles – Freedom

This original sculpture by a group of Haitian artists represents their continuing struggle for freedom and human rights. The sculpture was commissioned by international development charity Christian Aid and National Museums Liverpool to mark 200th anniversary of the abolition of the slave trade in 2007.

The Freedom! sculpture, made out of recycled objects such as metal car parts and raw junk found in the dangerous slums of the capital, Port-au-Prince, was created by young Haitians and sculptors Eugène, Céleur and Guyodo from Atis Rezistans in collaboration with Mario Benjamin, an internationally renowned Haitian artist who has represented his country at Biennials in Venice, São Paulo and Johannesburg.

http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ism/visit/floor-plan/freedom-sculpture.aspx