Low Residency – Day 2 – Peckham Gallery Visits

Camberwell Art Space

We first visited an exhibition of paintings and other works by David Troostwyk who had previously taught at College of Camberwell.  A paintstakingly catalogued collection of work some of which had not been on display before. I was drawn to the rocks he had collected from Culloden – perhaps this is because it has some relevance to my current investigations into Evocative Objects and the absent space left behind once an object is removed. In the catalogue he references the drawings of such objects (Black and White Paintings) outlines of objects from a tramps doss box from outside the Savoy to stones collected from historic battlefields. He says “The objects are drawn not exactly as silhouettes, nor as shadows, but as absenses. And as such their whiteness burns with a tragic brightness.”

Assembly Point

I really liked the Hyper Mesh exhibition at Assembly Point, the piece that I was most interested in was the piece Ban (2018) by Fleuryfontaine, silicone tinted by pigments.I have recently been looking at alternatives to latex and would like to experiment with silicone.

South London Gallery – Bloomberg Contemporaries

Lastly we visited the Bloomberg Contemporaries at the South London College.

Most mesmerizing for me was the piece I told you there was something in the air (2017) by Jessica Jordan Wrench an installation about static with audio from road trips, radios and splintered voices with mirror balls and blistered paint.

I was also impressed by the attention to detail and the perserverance demonstrated in the piece Penance (2016-2017) Hand Burnt Fabric by Camilla Hanney.

Curious about the piece Hatchery (2018) Ceramic, Acrylic and Metal by Viviana Troya. In the interview here she discusses the piece “It explores the basic needs in our society, such as food, reproduction, religion and humour. I see different layers in the work that speak about the forces that glue society together, ranging from what is supposed to be natural to our culture creations, and how we have transformed both over time.”

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